Comments for Face Climate Change http://www.faceclimatechange.com Finding purpose and peace of mind in standing up to climate change Thu, 03 Mar 2016 14:01:18 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6.6 Comment on Measuring Carbon Footprint: Flawed, but Essential by “Kic”: A Universal Unit for Climate Impact | Face Climate Change http://www.faceclimatechange.com/measuring-carbon-footprint-imperfect-but-essential/#comment-65 Thu, 03 Mar 2016 14:01:18 +0000 http://www.faceclimatechange.com/?p=214#comment-65 […] ← Previous Next → […]

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Comment on Remaking Holidays for Sustainability: Ways to Improve Any Holiday by Better Gifts for a Smaller Footprint | Sustainable Williston http://www.faceclimatechange.com/remaking-holidays-for-sustainability-ways-to-improve-any-holiday/#comment-34 Wed, 19 Nov 2014 16:57:38 +0000 http://www.faceclimatechange.com/?p=266#comment-34 […] a whole different set of sustainability challenges. Top among these after  travel and food (see my previous post) is gift-giving. Recycled wrapping paper or reusable gift bags are great, but be sure the gift in […]

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Comment on You want me to stop doing WHAT? by Remaking Holidays for Sustainability: Ways to Improve Any Holiday | Sustainable Williston http://www.faceclimatechange.com/you-want-me-to-stop-doing-what/#comment-33 Sun, 16 Nov 2014 14:44:10 +0000 http://www.faceclimatechange.com/?p=194#comment-33 […] Rethink air travel: Flying around the country and even the rest of the plant has become relatively inexpensive and easy, but unfortunately it’s one of the worst offenders in terms of emissions. Not only do planes burn a lot of fossil fuels, they push out their exhaust at altitudes where their bad effects are at least doubled compared to what they would be on the ground. It’s not up to me to tell you or your family members not to fly, but there are ways to fly less, for instance driving together in an efficient car, taking a bus or plane or boat, or making one longer visit instead of two shorter ones. For more information on flying, see “You Want Me to Stop Doing What?” […]

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Comment on You want me to stop doing WHAT? by Remaking Holidays for Sustainability: Ways to Improve Any Holiday | Face Climate Change http://www.faceclimatechange.com/you-want-me-to-stop-doing-what/#comment-32 Sun, 16 Nov 2014 14:40:33 +0000 http://www.faceclimatechange.com/?p=194#comment-32 […] Rethink air travel: Flying around the country and even the rest of the plant has become relatively inexpensive and easy, but unfortunately it’s one of the worst offenders in terms of emissions. Not only do planes burn a lot of fossil fuels, they push out their exhaust at altitudes where their bad effects are at least doubled compared to what they would be on the ground. It’s not up to me to tell you or your family members not to fly, but there are ways to fly less, for instance driving together in an efficient car, taking a bus or plane or boat, or making one longer visit instead of two shorter ones. For more information on flying, see “You Want Me to Stop Doing What?” […]

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Comment on “Kic”: A Universal Unit for Climate Impact by The Hidden Climate Benefits of eBooks | Face Climate Change http://www.faceclimatechange.com/k-coe/#comment-20 Thu, 27 Feb 2014 19:54:13 +0000 http://www.faceclimatechange.com/?p=217#comment-20 […] a new one being manufactured reduces your carbon footprint by (depending on the tablet) around 130 k-coes, according to this article. Since a sustainable individual footprint is only about 2,000 k-coes per […]

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Comment on In This Case, a Quiet Blog Means Progress by Amanda Walden http://www.faceclimatechange.com/in-this-case-a-quiet-blog-means-progress/#comment-14 Sat, 04 May 2013 02:40:08 +0000 http://www.faceclimatechange.com/?p=168#comment-14 WOW!!!!!! I’m impressed, Luc!

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Comment on We’re Eating Oil–Literally by Luc http://www.faceclimatechange.com/were-eating-oil-literally/#comment-10 Thu, 03 Jan 2013 15:42:13 +0000 http://www.faceclimatechange.com/?p=52#comment-10 That makes a lot of sense to me, James. This is the first thing we’re digging into as a family to try to transition, getting much more locally-grown food. This past summer we got almost all of our produce from a local organic CSA in combination with Janine’s garden, and you’re right: it was cheap. I think we’re going to have to seriously up our game, though. I’m encouraged to hear that when you and Cheryl made some of these kinds of changes, your diet got more interesting rather than the reverse!

To keep the time part manageable, we’ll be trying to do a lot of making huge batches of things to freeze and eat for multiple meals (not to mention work lunches). Fortunately, my son Ethan has developed some cooking skill, too, and we have two young girls coming up in the family who will also soon be doing some cooking. Many hands should make light work!

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Comment on The Easy Way to Fight Climate Change? Not Likely by Luc http://www.faceclimatechange.com/the-easy-way-to-fight-climate-change-not-likely/#comment-9 Sat, 29 Dec 2012 19:30:17 +0000 http://www.faceclimatechange.com/?p=63#comment-9 Good point, Elizabeth: Choice 3 is only half of it. It seems to me that we need to adopt a lot of new behaviors as part of trying to make them a new norm, but I don’t know the best way to go about that yet, just that we’d have a lot of trouble getting other people to do things we haven’t yet done ourselves. Now that you point it out, though, it seems like the kind of thing that different people would do in different ways. Because I have some good background in organizing groups, setting up social systems, and that kind of thing, I’m working on launching a group where people can provide each other with information, support, and friendship to help each other make big life changes. Of course, I’ll also probably try to write and speak as much as I can on the subject (especially as I get a bit more informed!). I’m thinking that for other people, the path might be teaching or networking or consulting or using social media or working through social connections to spread the word … it’s going to take a lot of different talents!

And I’m totally with you on biking to work in rain and snow. I sure would like to find a good alternative for that.

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Comment on The Easy Way to Fight Climate Change? Not Likely by Elizabeth http://www.faceclimatechange.com/the-easy-way-to-fight-climate-change-not-likely/#comment-8 Fri, 28 Dec 2012 23:56:57 +0000 http://www.faceclimatechange.com/?p=63#comment-8 I’m not sure your choice 3 ends up solving the problem, unless you’ve got a choice 3b in which the people modeling sustainable lifestyles manage to convince others of the problem before it’s too late.

Which doesn’t mean it’s not worth trying. I’ve recently made a list of things I can do to make my life more sustainable. I’m going to work on it, but it looks so futile–the easy things won’t make much difference and the hard things are, well, not appealing. (For example, setting up a clothesline vs giving up my car and biking to work in the rain and snow.)

I’m looking forward to your post on how we can feel more “bring it on” about it.

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Comment on We’re Eating Oil–Literally by James Maxey http://www.faceclimatechange.com/were-eating-oil-literally/#comment-7 Sat, 22 Dec 2012 13:26:04 +0000 http://www.faceclimatechange.com/?p=52#comment-7 I would argue that if we got rid of the economic incentives for corn monoculture, we might actually see the prices for healthier foods go down. I read somewhere that the farmland we devote to growing corn covers the area of two New York states. If this cropland were switched over to a more diverse array of crops, we might see food prices for other fruits and vegetable go down. In any case, I think it’s kind of an unfortunate myth that eating healthier is automatically more expensive. Many healthy staples like beans and rice are pretty cheap. If you have access to a farmers market and willing to adjust you’re diet to what’s grown seasonally, in peak seasons most vegetables are stupidly cheap. If you want to buy a tomato from a local farmers market in July, you can probably get a good deal. If you insist on buying tomatoes in January, you are likely paying to have them crossing thousands of miles to reach you.

My wife and I have made a transition to healthier eating this year, and I think we might actually be saving money once we finally purchased all our staples. We eat out less since eating a home gives us more control over our diets. The big expense hasn’t been money, but time. It takes a lot more brainpower and advance planning to have healthy meals, and cooking a stew from scratch is more time consuming than throwing a frozen pizza into an oven.

I think the biggest suprise is that our diet is now much more diverse than it used to be. We went into this thinking we’d be giving up a lot of stuff. Instead, we’ve discovered whole new categories of food and amazing flavors we were skipping over on our old diet. We didn’t need government intervention to change us. We changed to combat our expanding waistlines, but we’re sticking with it because, frankly, the healthier choices just taste better.

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